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Eco Inn Hotel Puno, Peru

Eco Inn Puno: a room with a view to Lake Titicaca

The city of Puno, in Peru, in one of the most popular points of departure to explore Lake Titicaca. Nestled up high in the Andes, this lake is shared between Peru and Bolivia, and it’s the biggest in South America.

Not surprisingly, being at the shore of the lake and fairly close to touristic Cusco and Machu Picchu, Puno is a part of the so called “Gringo Trail” that welcomes a big number of travelers wishing to explore the Sacred Valley of the Incas and surrounding areas.

While in Puno, we spent our days at the pretty Eco Inn. This hotel was built in an eco-friendly way and their friendliness shows in many other ways!

In the mood for love!

In the mood for love!

 

It took us around 7 hours to reach Puno, on a busy bus trip from Cusco. We couldn’t be more delighted when we entered our room, to find out that they had prepared it as if we were about to spend our wedding night. The funny thing is that Ashray had proposed only a few days earlier, so I could actually joke around saying that our wedding night had finally come!

The room was spacious, comfortable, we had chocolates and fruits, products to prepare ourselves a bubble bath and even candles. Apart from the goodies upon arrival, we were consistently presented with amazingly cute figures put together with towels, every single day. This one here was never dismantled - we didn’t have the heart for it! – and ended up being named Rodolfo:

Super cute towel art, aka, Rodolfo!

Super cute towel art, aka, Rodolfo!

 

The hotel is less than 10 minutes taxi ride from the city center but the truth is that there is nothing particularly interesting to see downtown. Puno is mostly a base for those wishing to explore the floating islands in Lake Titicaca or as a last stop in Peru, before crossing the border by land to Bolivia.

Within the hotel itself, you have everything you need for a pleasant stay – this is a great place to come back to at the end of day trips into the lake or after the rustic home-stays in the villages within the lake, that many travelers sign up for.

The restaurant serves all meals and commonly has a buffet available in the evening, when there are large groups of people around. Meals include local specialties as well as international favorites, served by friendly staff.

Sunny restaurant area

Sunny restaurant area

Dinner in the making

Dinner in the making

Good morning Peru!

Good morning Peru!

 

The common areas of the hotel include a living room where a fireplace is lit in the cold evenings. Coca tea to help ease altitude sickness is available 24/7 for free, as well as guide books and computers to keep in touch with the rest of the world.

Tea & fireplace at Puno Inn's sitting area

Tea & fireplace at Puno Inn's sitting area

 

Puno is all about the outdoor world and at Eco innn they didn’t over look this. You can walk outside by the lake and, within the hotel ground itself, purchase from the local community at a small handy crafts market and, the best part is that you can even enjoy the company of llamas!

Puno Inn Hotel facade

Puno Inn Hotel facade

Some people have dogs as pets... but here at Puno Inn they have llamas!

Some people have dogs as pets… but here at Puno Inn they have llamas!

 

At Eco Inn Puno you’ll enjoy an international standard of hospitality with a true Peruvian touch!

BOOK NOW!

 

More info:
Eco Inn Puno
reservaspuno@ecoinnhotels.com
Av. Chulluni 195
Puno, Peru
+51 365525


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4 Comments

  • Veronica Says

    Yes, it looks really nice. But…they charge Peruvians/residents of Peru a higher price than visitors. http://www.ecoinnhotels.com/main.php?K=4455

    Does it make any sense?

    • Zara Says

      I actually didn’t know this, but I am assuming it has to do with the fact that Peruvians or people that stay in the country for longer than 90 days have to pay taxes. So their price will include VAT (or some other tax) making it higher. Actually, in some other hotels during our stay in Peru, people tried to charge us the price with tax – if travelers don’t know or don’t notice, they might end up spending more than required, and some establishments do take advantage of this, so it’s important to keep an eye. But I guess when it comes to locals and residents paying those taxes, there is nothing the establishments can do.
      But I agree: it does SUCK that locals have to pay more! But it would suck as much if travelers had to pay taxes – already they have pay those in their own countries.

  • Veronica Says

    Thank you for your answer.

  • Anita Says

    Towel art rocks!

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