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Best street food in the Philippines

30 Must-Try Street Foods When Traveling in the Philippines

Dreaming about visiting the Philippines sometime soon?

Here’s a list of 30 popular Filipino street foods you can enjoy when traveling in the Philippines!

 

1. Lechon Manok

Lechon Manok, aka, Pinoy Roast Chicken

Lechon Manok, aka, Pinoy Roast Chicken

Lechon Manok is the street version of roasted chicken. You can find places selling chicken almost everywhere, and they usually open in the evening. It’s best for dinner or pulutan (Filipino term for food when drinking).

Price: $3 (150 pesos)

 

2. Puto Bumbong

Filipino sticky rice, known as Puto Bumbong

Filipino sticky rice, known as Puto Bumbong

Puto Bumbong is one of the traditional Christmas foods in the Philippines. It’s sticky rice with a purple color. It’s served with butter or margarine and you can add coconut grains on top, mixed with sugar.

Price: $0.5 (25 pesos)

 

3. Bibingka

Bibingka - Filipino coconut cake

Bibingka – Filipino coconut cake

Bibingka (pictured on the right) is another popular Filipino street food eaten during Christmas. This egg based dessert is eaten alongside Puto Bumbong (pictured left). These foods are usually served on a banana leaf.

Price: $1 (40 pesos)

 

4. Sisig

Sisig, Filipino Sizzling Pork

Sisig, Filipino Sizzling Pork

Pork Sisig is made with chopped pig’s face and ears, with chicken liver. It’s usually seasoned with chili red peppers and calamansi (golden lime).

Price: $1 (50 pesos)

 

5. Halo-Halo

Traditional Filipino dessert Halo-Halo

Traditional Filipino dessert Halo-Halo

Halo-halo is the most popular summer dessert in the Philippines. It consists of shaved ice and evaporated milk, with a mix of sweet fruits and other sweet ingredients such as corn, coconut, sweet beans and more.

Price: $1-2 (30-70 pesos)

 

6. Palabok

Filipino rice noodle dish Palabok

Filipino rice noodle dish Palabok

Palabok a noodle dish with cooked shrimps and shrimp sauce, pork, crushed chicharon, tofu and fried garlic. It’s served anytime of the day, from breakfast to dinner.

Price: $1-2 (30-70 pesos)

 

7. Pancit

Pancit served alongside Lumpia. Photo by Tim (bit.ly/1ZYsuZ2)

Pancit served alongside Lumpia. Photo by Tim (bit.ly/1ZYsuZ2)

Pancit is a Filipino noodle dish mixed with pork, chicken and vegetables. It’s served for breakfast and merienda (afternoon snack).

Price: $0.5 (25 pesos)

 

7. Adobo

Adobo: one of the most beloved dishes in the Philippines

Adobo: one of the most beloved dishes in the Philippines

Adobo consists of chicken or pork marinated with vinegar, soy sauce and garlic. It’s one of the most famous dishes in the Philippines.

Price: $1-2 (40-60 pesos)

 

8. Puto

Puto: Filipino steamed rice cake

Puto: Filipino steamed rice cake

Puto is the Filipino name for a steamed rice cake. Top it up with butter, coconut or cheese.

Price: $0.10 (5-10 pesos)

 

9. Ice Cream Sandwich

Filipino ice-cream sandwich

Filipino ice-cream sandwich

Ice cream inside bread. For me, this is one of the weirdest foods in the Philippines!

Price: $0.25 (20 pesos)

 

10. Lechon

Lechon in the Philippines

Lechon in the Philippines

Lechon is a pork dish. The whole pig is roasted over charcoal. In the Philippines this dish is commonly served during big family celebrations or special occasions. Filipinos eat the meat with their hands.

Price: $1-10  (50-1000 pesos)

 

11. Lumpiang Shanghai

Spring rolls in the Philippines are known as Lumpiang Shanghai

Spring rolls in the Philippines are known as Lumpiang Shanghai

Lumpiang is the Filipino name for fried spring rolls.

Price: $0.10 (5-10 pesos)

 

12. Smoothies

Fruit smoothies are a common street snack in the Philippines

Fruit smoothies are a common street snack in the Philippines

There are plenty of tasty fruit Smoothies in the Philippines. Mango, strawberry, papaya… choose your favorite!

Price: $1.5 (60-80 pesos)

 

13. Bangus

Bangus: Philippines grilled milkfish

Bangus: Philippines grilled milkfish

Bangus is the Filipino name for milkfish, which is usually fried and served with soya or vinegar and garlic.

Price: $2 (60-80 pesos)

 

14. Tilapia

Grilled Tilapia in the Philippines. Photo by Niko (bit.ly/1PpoZU3)

Grilled Tilapia in the Philippines. Photo by Niko (bit.ly/1PpoZU3)

Tilapia is a fish normally stuffed and cooked with tomatoes and other vegetables.

Price: $2 (60-80 pesos)

 

15. Mami

A plate of Mami in the Philippines

A plate of Mami in the Philippines

Mami is a soup with noodles, chicken, beef, pork, wonton dumplings, intestines and boiled egg.

Price: $1 (30-40 pesos)

 

16. Arroz Caldo

Filipino Arroz Caldo. Photo by flippinyank (bit.ly/1Kb77ut)

Filipino Arroz Caldo. Photo by flippinyank (bit.ly/1Kb77ut)

Arroz Caldo is a Filipino soup with rice, to be eaten hot.

Price: $0.5 (20 pesos)

 

17. Empanadas

Empanadas in the Philippines. Photo by Kirk K (bit.ly/22Xt6Ao)

Empanadas in the Philippines. Photo by Kirk K (bit.ly/22Xt6Ao)

Empanadas are the most popular street eat in Ilocos, Northern Philippines.

Prices: $0.5-1 (20-40 pesos)

 

18. Tocino

Tocino dish in the Philippines. Photo by Arnold Gatilao (bit.ly/1ZYoQ16)

Tocino dish in the Philippines. Photo by Arnold Gatilao (bit.ly/1ZYoQ16)

Tocino is pork meat from the belly. It’s very popular in the Philippines.

Price: $1-2 (40-70 pesos)

 

19. Longanisa

Longanisa: Filipino sweet sausage

Longanisa: Filipino sweet sausage

Longanisas are sausages with spices, usually preserved with garlic. They taste very sweet.

Price: $1-2 (40-70 pesos)

 

20. Balut

Balut: fertilized duck eggs

Balut: fertilized duck eggs

Balut is a developing duck embryo. It’s eaten after boiled.

Price: $0.20 (10 pesos)

 

21. Tapsilog

Traditional Filipino dish Tapsilog. Photo by Rocor (bit.ly/1N4YjGo)

Traditional Filipino dish Tapsilog. Photo by Rocor (bit.ly/1N4YjGo)

Tapsilong is a Filipino a meal consisting of beef, garlic fried rice and fried egg. The beef is also called Tapa.

Price: $1 (40-50 pesos)

 

22. Ube

Filipino Ube dessert. Photo by Stephen Kennedy (bit.ly/1JHQ2gO)

Filipino Ube dessert. Photo by Stephen Kennedy (bit.ly/1JHQ2gO)

Ube is a dessert made from boiled and mashed purple yam. It’s really sweet and tasty.

Price: $0.5-1 (30-50 pesos)

 

23. Turon

Filipino Turon. Photo by Gino Cartesiano (bit.ly/1UM4nsW)

Filipino Turon. Photo by Gino Cartesiano (bit.ly/1UM4nsW)

Turon is a sweet banana spring roll. The banana is rolled on an eggroll wrapper and fried crispy with glazed sugar.

Price: $0.20 (10-20 pesos)

 

24. Pan de Sal

Pan de Sal, the staple bread in the Philippines

Pan de Sal, the staple bread in the Philippines

Pan the Sal is the main bread in the Philippines. It’s almost like a main commodity in every household. It’s a bread roll made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar and salt. Commonly eaten with butter too.

Price: $0.05 (2 pesos)

 

25. Taho

Filipino Taho

Filipino Taho

Taho is a snack food made from fresh soft tofu and sago pearl. It’s very sweet.

Price: $0.10 (10 pesos)

 

26. Leche Flan

Traditional Filipino dessert Leche Flan

Traditional Filipino dessert Leche Flan

Leche Flan is a typical Filipino dessert made of eggs and milk, with soft caramel on the top.

Price: $1 (40 pesos)

 

27. Sugar apple

Custard apples

Custard apples

It’s the fruit of Annona squamosa.

Price: $1/kilo (40 pesos kilo)

 

28. Okoy

Okoy, Filipino shrimp fritters

Okoy, Filipino shrimp fritters

Okoy or Ukoy is the Philippines’ version of shrimp fritters. Okoy is cooked by mixing very small shrimps (with the heads and shells still on) with flour, cornstarch, egg batter and deep fried until it forms the usual Okoy shape (see the image above). It can be paired with rice and any dish, and tastes really good with vinegar and chili dip.

Price: $0.25 (10 pesos)

 

29. Kilawin

Kilawin, the Philippines answer to ceviche

Spicy and sour Pork Kilawin

Kilawin is one of the tastiest dishes I have tried in small canteens (carinderias) in the Philippines. It is grilled pork belly soaked in vinegar. This is great to eat with rice (like almost all the dishes in the country), or as a snack when drinking beer.

Price: $1 (40 pesos)

 

30. Champorado

Champorado: typical Filipino breakfast of sweet chocolate rice

Champorado: typical Filipino breakfast of sweet chocolate rice

Champorado is one of the most common breakfast foods in the Philippines. It is rice cooked with cocoa powder, with the option of adding milk and sugar for serving (which almost everyone does!) This truly matches the Filipino culture of eating rice with most of their dishes. It’s also a favorite to eat during rainy days. Champorado is usually homemade, but some street stores sell it too.

Price: $0.25 (20-30 pesos)

 

A lot of these Filipino street foods fall under my really cheap but delicious food radar!

Eating cheaply while traveling around the Philippines is actually very easy. If I had to pick a favorite, I’d go with Sisig (number 4) and Palabok (number 6). I love paring those foods with rice and beer.

Regarding Balut, I have only tried it once to taste it. It’s a challenge, because not all foreigners can actually eat it!

 

How about you?

What street foods would you like to try in the Philippines?

 

Hit us with your thoughts in the comments.

Buen viaje amigos!

 

Ruben from Gamin Traveler

Ruben from Gamin Traveler

Ruben Arribas is a Spanish traveler who has been to 70+ countries around the world. If you value real cheap travel guides and offbeat destinations, he is your go-to guy. Read his tips and stories in Gamin Traveler and join the community on Facebook and Twitter.

Article’s featured photo by Ian Sane


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18 Comments

  • Rachel Says

    First comment! Ha :) Hey guys, this is an amazing list, also these prices are quite accurate,and here in the Philippines, prices for street food don’t change easily, so anyone trying to budget for food can have a great plan with this list. Yum!

  • rochiel Says

    the title popped in my email,opened immediately because i thought you’re here in the philippines hahah..
    hope you visit our country soon!

  • “Bibingka” is surely related to a similar dish of Portuguese origin, served in Goa, India… I loved that!

    These look yummy, although I’d need to be really careful of the prevalence of pork in Filipino cuisine.

    • Ruben Says

      Bibingka is one of the most popular street foods in North Philippines and it’s really yummy! Filipino cuisine they use pork everytime, you will get use to if you visit Philippines!!

    • Zara Says

      Hey Tim!
      I know at least one vegan person who traveled and ate successfully around the Philippines.. so, even though pork seems very popular, I’m sure there are plenty of other tasty options too! ;)

    • Bing Says

      Bibingka is made of grind rice and coconut milk in some places in the Philippines. There are places like North Luzon who uses cassava flour, coconut milk, egg and some cheeze toppings. I can assure you guys that no pork on bibingkas.

  • Yummy looking list!! I hope to make it to the Philippines one day to try a few of these delicious looking things!

  • Barry R. Maes Says

    Clear, informative, simple. Love your post!

  • You guys have spoilt your readers with choice, not bad even vegetarians have some amazing stuff to try in Philippines!

  • berns Says

    HMM.. YUMMY!! nice :) but wheres Tokneneng (quail eggs) and fishballs??

  • Joanna Says

    Nice post! Now i’m drooling. I’m starting to miss the Philippines. Ive started my blog but haven’t write anything about the Philippines yet! Can’t wait to be home..

  • Hi! I enjoyed reading your MUST-TRY STREET FOODS and I think I should try some of them :) I hope you would check out mine too!

  • Ross Galan Says

    NOTE that a “Bibingka” for the Ilokanos and the Ibanags has nothing to do with the Tagalogs “Bibingka”. Both Ilokanos and Ibanags ‘Bibingka’ is made from sticky/glutinous rice flour (‘malagkit’) and topped with syrup (latík).

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